Convention of 1899

This treaty was entered into December 2, 1899, and after ratification proclaimed Febru­ary 16, 1900, between the United States, Ger­many, and Great Britain “to adjust amicably the questions which have arisen between them in respect to the Samoan group of Islands, as well as to avoid all future misunderstanding in respect to their joint or several rights and claims of possession or jurisdiction therein.”

 

The body of the treaty is short and reads as follows:

 

Article I

 

The General Act concluded and signed by the aforesaid Powers at Berlin on the 14th day of June, A.D. 1889, and all previous treaties, con­ventions and agreements relating to Samoa, are annulled.

 

Article II 

 

Germany renounces in favor of the United States of America all her rights and claims over and in respect to the Islands of Tutuila and all other islands of the Samoan group east of Longi­tude 171 degrees west of Greenwich.

 

Great Britain in like manner renounces in favor of the United States of American all her rights and claims over and in respect to the Island of Tutuila and all other islands of the Samoan group east of Longitude 171 degrees west of Greenwich.

 

Reciprocally, the United States of America renounces in favor of Germany all her rights and claims over and in respect to the Islands of Upolu and Savai'i and all other Islands of the Samoan group west of Longitude 171 degrees west of Greenwich.

 

Article III

It is understood and agreed that each of the three signatory Powers shall continue to enjoy, in respect to their commerce and commercial vessels, in all the islands of the Samoan group, privileges and conditions equal to those enjoyed by the sovereign Powers, in all ports which may be open to the commerce of either of them. (2 Malloy Treaties 1596.)